The Importance of Good Relationship between Canadian Cities

Published: 2019-05-31 16:53:24
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The authors of this article evaluate the relationship between metropolitan area population and per-worker productivity which is always viewed as the existence of agglomeration economies. According to the authors, this connection is strong in cities with high skill and does not exist in the less skilled metropolitan. According to the evidence of the article, the bigger cities always attract the most skilled workers as compared to small cities. This means that human capital accumulates faster in urban area. This article is good for this research since it pinpoints why some cities may be lagging behind in terms of development which interferes with their relationship with other municipalities.

The study investigates the state of Canadian cities in terms of social polarization, social mix, and gentrification. The authors of this article address the social gap between the cities by examining the relationship that exist between changes in income structure, ethnic diversity, shift in immigrant concentration using the census data for each decade from the year 1971 to 2001. The authors found that gentrification is implicated in the development of the income polarization and inequality. This article is useful in assessing how ethnic differences and income inequalities determine the relationship of cities.

The myth of the North American city: continentalism challenged. UBC Press.The goal of this book is to enhance the understanding and nature of cities. In specific, the authors concentrated in North American cities and distinctly discussing Canadian metropolises. The authors also gave out an empirical basis of understanding the lifestyle and economic nature of the cities and how they can relate to each other to ensure a massive development. This article is imperative for this study since it improves the understanding of different cities in Canada.

The Importance of Good Relationship between Canadian Cities

Relationship between cities also known as a symbiotic relationship is one of the imperative facet the makes a typical global community. Notably, it is well established that most cities do not have the same lifestyle, same values, and culture. Similarly, some are more populated than others while some are more developed. For example, Toronto is the most populous city in Canada while Vancouver is the eighth populated. Notably, it is irrefutable that most cities face different problems such over population, environmental problems, and differences in leadership styles that influence good relationship between the cities. For example, faster growth in one of the cities will ease the resource strain that Toronto is undergoing due to its excess number of individuals. Further, a good relationship between the cities will ensure that there are no cases of crime and wealth imbalance among them since they will work jointly. This will provide equal opportunities among people and will also ensure integration of different cultures that exist between the cities. It is in this context that this research will look at the importance of good relationship among the cities and how it can be achieved.

Research objectives

- To investigate how Canadian cities can have a good relationship among them

- To examine the significance of good city-to city relationship

- To identify the cultural and economic differences between the cities

Research questions

- Do Canadian cities foster a good relationship among them?

- What are the significances of having a good relationship between cities?

- What are the cultural and economic differences in Canadian cities?

References

Glaeser, E. L., & Resseger, M. G. (2010). The complementarity between cities and skills*. Journal of Regional Science, 50(1), 221-244.

Goldberg, M., & Mercer, J. (2011). The myth of the North American city: continentalism challenged. UBC Press.Walks, R. A., & Maaranen, R. (2008). Gentrification, social mix, and social polarization: Testing the linkages in large Canadian cities. Urban Geography,29(4), 293-326.

 

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