Conflict Resolution in China

Published: 2019-10-16 07:30:00
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Its very common to assume that china and every other Asian country that shares their cultural heritage, resolve their conflicts through meditations rather than their appeals to politics. Apparently, I was asked to talk about the concept of conflict resolution between the Chinese people and the people of United States. I found this a bit challenging, because in a traditional sense there is no such thing as conflict resolution in china especially when the conflict exists between the Chinese and the non-Chinese people (Nguyen, Thi Hai Yen, 2002, p. 469). However, the carter center has made some resolutions as far as US-China relationship is concerned. This program has put all its efforts and dedications in preserving the US-China relationships. The program works to build a good relationship between US and China on issues concerning global importance which includes, offering scholarships, nurturing young leaders who might shape the bilateral relationship between the United States and china as well as making it to be the cornerstone of universal peace and prosperity.

The Chinese Program also works to point out the collective and coordinated benefits of actions between the US and China, Africa, and the Latin America. For instance: it develops a platform that specifically monitors and reports on regional crises that may possibly result in both interior chaos and destroy the critical U.S-China bilateral relationship (Taulbee et al. 2003, p.170). The program further boosts multilateral dialogue that will help solve local conflicts, give advice and provide assistance to the development of the local people, efforts to political reforms, and produce measures in confidence-building for the U.S.-China relationship. In order, to monitor the issues affecting the United States and china relations the program will select young professional scholars to be comrades working in both countries. The comrades will also participate in many Center's worldwide for the purposes of observing elections. Through good governance and community development the program has also recognized that in order to have a meaningful kind of democracy, there has to be citizens who are well involved and informed. The Carter Centre also worked in collaboration with the chinas disabled persons federation to enhance education opportunities for the handicapped children (Taulbee et al. 2003, p.160) . They trained the teachers, as well as building special education classes in which the disabled children were enrolled in.

Conclusion

While the direct negotiations to solve armed conflicts is the main focus of this program, it also puts emphasis in preventing the conflict as well. In the event of crises and chaos that may contribute to the deterioration of the societys political stability, Different political parties may approach Carter Center program to act as a neutral third party or the peaceful negotiator to facilitate a kind of dialogue that can keep tension from break out into a conflict of violence (Nguyen, Thi Hai Yen, 2002, p. 480). Putting a stop to a fight doesnt always mean that the conflict has completely been resolved. The process of peaceful agreement is even longer than you can imagine. First all the parties in conflict must be held accountable for implementing their agreements in good faith. Even after the agreements implementations the cause of conflict might be longer, or even go deeper and sometimes the conflict might even reignited again. Therefore, the program seeks better ways to ease the tension, and bring sense into the parties as well as bringing justice to the victims.

ReferencesNguyen, Thi Hai Yen. "Beyond good offices? The role of regional organizations in conflict resolution." Journal of International Affairs (2002): 463-484.

Taulbee, James Larry, and Marion V. Creekmore Jr. "NGO Mediation: The Carter Center." International Peacekeeping 10, no. 1 (2003): 156-171.

sheldon

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