An Argumentative Essay to The Topic "Perseverance"

Published: 2019-06-26 20:59:31
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Ms. Santos Luiz Perseverance paper offers insightful information of how perseverance is a towering virtue in Jane Eyres text. She incorporates enough quotes, examples and assertions that ideally point out to Janes untold suffering throughout her life and her eventual happiness. The story of perseverance is confined in several stages of Janes life. The stages are childhood at Gateshead, schooling in Lowood, Janes tenure as governess, living with the Rivers and the eventual life with Rochester. Along the stages, Jane Eyre becomes a mature woman grounded on faith, morality and hard work despite the number of hardships and disheartening events that are strewn along her journey. Mrs. Luiz writes the paper against the backdrop of the modern day society that embraces equity and equality as compared to Jane Eyres patriarchal 18th-century society (Fisher and Ellen 54). Luiz presents an assortment of ideas that not only show perseverance as a theme in the Jane Eyre story but also as her strongest trait that saw her attain her eventual happiness.

Luiz emerges as an author is keen on convincing the audience on the plight women go through in the face of some societal aspects. She seeks to connect with the audience from a deeper level. She uses the Victorian age and culture to highlight how far womenfolk have come in terms of gender progress, self-awareness, and self-development. It is from these positions that she delves into Jane Eyres narrative trying to inspire and teach the audience about the need to appreciate the leaps made century wise by the society, particularly women as they are chief victims of an intolerant patriarchal culture. Luiz hopes that the audience will share in the values she espouses in the paper. She argues her case in the hope that she strikes a chord with the open-minded audience that would share in Jane Eyres experiences and achievements. Overall, she celebrates societal progress and the willed women like Jane Eyre that continue to struggle even in the modern day society.

The authors expectation of the audience is founded on the need to create the impression that patriarchal societies inhibit the growth of women. Luiz tries to link Janes struggles with feminism undertones setting the stage for a rather biased article that may be deemed subjective rather than objective in many quarters. She uses Sandra Gilberts feminist assertions that link the female woes to the irrational patriarchal society that is well captured in Jane Eyres narration. Jane is posited as the champion of the downtrodden women that put up with what society throws at them. This, from an objective perspective, can be confined to Jane Eyres case only. However, Luiz tries to balance her feminist perspective by pointing out Rochesters plight in the hands of the same society. The patriarchal society forces Rochester to put up with a woman he barely loves nor consider worth his affections. She had left me thirsty and all my life would be thirst and longing for what I had lost before I found it as Rochesters confession depicts the patriarchal society and its victimization of men (Techman 73). It is not a universal norm, which can be used to champion the feminist agenda that Ms. Luiz is clearly seen agitating for in the essay.

The author further seems to gravitate towards religion and culture as inhibitory features in the development of the female gender. Defiance of cultural norms is asserted to be right and progressive. Luiz uses Brontes assertions that Conventionality is not morality to strengthen her argument. Luiz notes that culture and religion in the then Victorian culture seemed to go hand in hand in magnifying a few at the expense of many. Jane Eyre is posited by Luiz as a victim of both culture and religion, which seems to cast her aside as an outsider due to a number of situations which are not of her making. Jane is established as a defiant woman that overlooks a number of norms to attain self-realization and true love. Her independent thinking was not synonymous with the Victorian women that were satisfied being homemakers by necessity and not by choice.

The author employs a persuasive tone in a large part of Jane Eyres narrative. She uses her experiences and encounters to evoke feelings of emotion and sympathy from the audience. Jane is considered a burden and being orphaned has no family to speak of asserts a sympathetic Luiz in the paper (Bronte 9). She even quotes Brontes text No you are less than a servant, for you do nothing for your keep to depict the harshness Jane Eyre had to contend with even in her in innocent childhood. Luiz employs rhetorical strategies such as logos to cement further her expression of Jane Eyres sad experiences. She does so through her deductive arguments that she incorporates in the paper to highlight how helpless Jane was in virtually every stage of her life but still found a way to persevere and soldier on. Her diction is impeccable in lending substance to her arguments. The word immutable is used to denote Jane Eyre as a hardened or strong-willed individual that can never succumb to challenges. Luiz further cites designated box highlight the mental captivity that Jane did not succumb to in her efforts to achieve eventual happiness (Rich 48).

Luiz tries as much as possible to back her statements with appropriate evidence, which serves to advance her arguments. Her use of direct quotations from reliable sources such as The Temptations of a Motherless Woman, JANE EYRE: The Quest For Optimism and Brontes Jane Eyre affirms this. Her audience can easily revisit these sources and understand keenly her thematic standpoints on the plight of the men and women in the context of Victorian culture that was characterized by patriarchy and retrogressive religious beliefs. Her interpretations of the text is adequate in that she allows each persona in her paper to be grounded on proper evidence. She captures the tribulations of Jane Eyre from the eyes of other pundits and authors. Rochesters unhappiness with the predetermined love life thanks to the inhibitive society is captured by his confessions as derived from Brontes Jane Eyre.

The author is highly convincing in her narration and argument against the patriarchy, culture and religion as the key foundations of limitations meted on men, women and faith. She critically isolates each group of focus (men, women and faith). Rochesters tribulations, for instance, were used to depict the male struggles in the Victorian society. Jane Eyres experiences, on the other hand, are analyzed largely to show how inhibitory the Victorian society was to women. Faith is also discussed alluding to Brontes assertions that self-righteousness is not religion in order to highlight how society had narrowed and twisted the interpretation of doctrines to suit their moral shortcomings.Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. Irvine: Saddleback Educational Pub, 2010. Print.

Bronte, Charlotte, and Richard J. Dunn. Jane Eyre: An Authoritative Text, Context, Criticism. New York: Norton, 2001. Print.

Fisher, Jerilyn, and Ellen S. Silber. Women in Literature: Reading Through the Lens of Gender. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2003. Print.

Rich, Adrian. JANE EYRE: The Temptations of a Motherless Woman. New York: Norton & Company Inc., 2001. Print.

Teachman, Debra. Understanding Jane Eyre: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2001. Print.

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