What is the risk of second hand smoke to non-smokers as compared to smokers?

Published: 2019-10-22 07:30:00
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The American Cancer Society, health risks of second-hand smoke, learns about cancer, 2016. The article gives information about the various types of second-hand smoke and the effects to the passive and active smoker. The article also gives finer details on the effects of second-hand smoking, like cancer and respiratory diseases. It also gives the reader reading materials in the reference section for further reading. Each point is well illustrated with a heading, and the points are well listed making it clear for the reader to note down the main points.

According to Jayes, Ratschen, Murray, Dymond-White, & Britton (2015), second-hand smoke is also known as the environmental tobacco smoke. The smoke is emitted from the smokers mouth and from the light end of the cigar, pipe or cigarette. The smoke has adverse effects both to the active and passive smokers, such respiratory infections. There has been recent cases of cancer and other health related problems that are passed on to the kids and teens as a result of parents who are smokers. Most of the related health problems that teens and adults suffer from as a result of passive smoking are nasal sinuses, brain, stomach and breast cancer.

Brown (2015), second hand smoke: teens health, the Nemours Foundation. The article gives practical experience and illustrations whereby teens and kids are exposed to smoke. The article also gives the reader animated pictures and clips on the effects of second hand smoke. The author of the article Steven also gives the reader an example of two teens Emma and Megan who were exposed to the effects of second hand smoke and the effects. The article also gives the reader an opportunity to participate in filling a questionnaire that helps in further research on the topic.

According to Brown (2015), second hand smoke is more dangerous than smoke that is consumed by the direct smoker. He further states that the chemicals that are released to the second hand smoker, which includes ammonia, hydrogen and arsenic is toxic and leads to cancer (carcinogens). Second hand smoke increases the chances of one suffering from respiratory infections like bronchitis, asthma and heart diseases.

Naeem (2015), second hand smoke exposure higher for kids and teens, Canada. The article gives a visual illustration of how second hand smoke can lead to higher risks for kids and teens. The article picture shows how curious kids in the back of a seat view their parent smoking as they drive. This gives a clear picture of the adverse effects of second hand smoke not only to adults but to kids as well. The article also gives studies and further research that show evidence of reduced second hand smoking in todays society.

According to Dr. Kapur research (2013) conducted on 5,800 people who live in Canada aged 3 to 79 years shows high levels of nicotine in their urine and blood samples. This shows that though the rate of second hand smoke has reduced for citizens of Canada, the level of smoking among teens and the adults is still high. The results of the sample also shows that the danger of smoking is high among kids and teens compare to adults.

Jayes, Ratschen, Murray, Dymond-White, & Britton (2015), second hand smoke in four English prisons: BMC public health. The United Kingdom. The article gives the reader statistical information for surveys conducted inform of tables. The article also gives the reader with the procedure used to conduct research and the findings. The article also provides graphical representations of the research findings to give the reader a clear picture on the adverse effects of second hand smoke.

According to Naeem (2015), the adverse effects of smoking led the UK government to introduce a smoke-free legislation that ensured that all work places and public places were smoke free. The research on the effect of second hand smoke in prisons also shows high levels of intoxication, with high levels recorded to be caused by the staff members of the prisons such as wardens, security officers, and the administration. Most of the inmates in prisons are addicts of bhang and cigarette. They, therefore, engage in high levels of smoking as a way of coping with the pressures and stress of a prison.

In conclusion, second hand smoking has proved to be one of the causes of severe cancer conditions for non-smokers as well as smokers in the United States as well as the whole world. The research conducted by various scholars show that second hand smokers have higher risks to respiratory and heart diseases.

References

Brown, C. (2015). Second-hand smoke exposure higher for kids and teens. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 187(14), 1040-1040. http://dx.doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.109-5148

Jayes, L., Ratschen, E., Murray, R., Dymond-White, S., & Britton, J. (2015). Second-hand smoke in four English prisons: an air quality monitoring study. BMC Public Health, 16(1). http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2757-y

Naeem, Z. (2015). Second-Hand Smoke : Ignored Implications. International Journal Of Health Sciences, 9(2), v-vi. http://dx.doi.org/10.12816/0024103

sheldon

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