Inclusion of Students Who Are Blind and Visually Impaired

Published: 2020-04-28 06:10:35
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Generally, visual impairment is any level of blindness caused by a problem in the brain or in the visual system that hinders a persons ability to carry out daily life chores. The main aim of educating students is to provide them with the necessary resources that will empower them to become successful in the society. Inclusion has helped many students with visual disabilities from special education classes into general education upbringings to study with their peers. There are factors that have led to good relation to all students in their academics and many impaired students have been treated as equal. This essay discusses how external variables can affect inclusion.

Illumination is one of the factor variables. It deals with the type, intensity, and the direction of light in the surrounding that is making it easier or harder to see clearly. Task lighting is recommended for students who need high levels of lighting. It will ensure that light directed on the task comes from the opposite side and only directed on the task. Glares should be reduced in order to distribute an equal amount of light on a visual task. This will enable students to carry out their work in a relaxed visual environment.

Spacing

One should consider some permanent arrangements in a classroom that includes visually impaired students. The classroom should be free of visual and physical clutter. It should not contain excessive materials and furniture. This will reduce visual clutter and helps impaired students to locate their sitting places independently. Disabled students will master the classroom arrangement in the shortest time therefore enhancing self-determination in navigation. The impaired students should also be allocated front line seats so as to gain maximum information in class.

Labeling Systems

People in charge should consider a method of putting signs and labels around the classroom so that blind or impaired students can have access to information. Labels are supposed to be in the form of Braille, object, print or even pictures. Important landmarks and signs should be positioned in strategic places that are well defined and can be accessed by all students. This will help such students trace materials easily hence encouraging independency among students. Labeling of resources with a Braille labeler machine can also be useful because it is paired with a printer hence enabling non Braille students to make labels. It is also quick when it comes to making labels in a classroom.

Playground Adaptation

Blind or impaired students need to be trained in order to visually scan the playing field or use auditory cue when moving from one place to another. The sports equipment should be painted in brighter colors so that impaired students can spot them from far. Field boundaries should be marked with brightly colored tapes or cones to create high contrast for students with low vision to identify the edges. They should be endowed with sound localization cues that can indicate a score. It will always motivate them and draw a whole picture meeting a target in mind. It is also a best precaution to place materials at a height that will not be accidentally scratched or wounded.

School Safety

School management generally has to ensure that they give students with such disability a special consideration and be assured of a safe environment. There should be well planned fire and emergency safety in the school so that in case of an emergency, visually impaired students may not be harmed. Buildings should be in good conditions both inside and outside so that they cannot fall on students. The school should have access to wheelchairs and lifts for students to access the buildings easily. General safety tips and procedures should be put in place for smooth running of activities in the school.

Work Cited

Huebner, K.M. (2000). Visual impairment. In M.K. Holbrook & A.J. Koenig (Eds.), Foundations of education (2nd ed.): Volume history and theory of teaching children and youths with visual impairment (pp. 55-76). New York: AFB Press

sheldon

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