Organizational Cultures and Values

Published: 2018-03-05 01:01:11
307 words
1 pages
3 min to read
letter-mark
B
letter
University/College: 
Vanderbilt University
Type of paper: 
Essay
This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

 

Many factors are known to cause organizational conflicts in hospitals (Grice & Greenan, 2008). Clearly, the case addressed in this assignment would not be an exemption. The first source of hospital conflict is exaggerated managerial expectation. After hospital re-organization, nurses will be required to meet new work targets. Over-demanding targets attract opposition from nurses (Murray, 2009). 

Nurses may conflict with the hospital especially after the changes due to communication breakdown (Aikens, 2009). This scenario will occur if managers fail to accept the input of employees towards hospital improvement in a continous basis. Similarly, the organization may face heightened conflicts after the changes if nurses feel that the hospital is no longer accounting for its shortfalls. Organizational changes are known to cause errors and in some cases, losses (Grice & Greenan, 2008). 

It is necessary that hospital managers accept the responsibility of these changes. Finally, the hospital may face challenges if there is miscommunication between it and nurses. For instance, if nurses do not learn of their new responsibilities (Murray, 2009). These challenges require that hospital managers remain on high alert to reduce the chances of complete collapse. To ensure that nurses do not dispute new management expectations, managers should ensure that they allow them to take part in the preparation of these targets (Murray, 2009). 

Hospital’s communication breakdown would be addressed through the use of circulars (Aikens, 2009). Senior managers must learn to accept accountability if the newly changed department experience difficulties. By doing so, they would save the hospital from uncontrolled risk of failure. Finally, hospital miscommunication, is addressable through continuous hospital meetings which would be useful to ensuring that nurses learn of their new responsibilities. 

References

Grice, T. & Greenan, J. (2008). Nursing (1st ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Aikens, C. (2009). Hospital management (1st ed.). London: Routledge.

Murray, J. (2009). Hospital (1st ed.). Edina, Minn.: ABDO Pub. Co.

sheldon

Request Removal

If you are the original author of this essay and no longer wish to have it published on the SpeedyPaper website, please click below to request its removal: