College Athletes Should Be Paid

Published: 2019-07-08 12:47:44
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The matter of paying the college athletes has made a serious buzz in the field of sports and is likely that the heated dialogue is here to stay for some more time. However, this discussion becomes more intense when such players get some injuries that need financial aids. Moreover, it has been realized that such schools get a lot of money from the athletes who widens the gap of the amount that they remain with and those that they give out for the scholarship. While the opponents of paying college athletes argue that there is no need for further salary since the amount given for scholarship is too much, the proponents say that the players have other needs apart from scholarship. Therefore, in regards to what the schools collect from college athletes, it would be of great honor and will serve them ethically right to pay college athlete since they can save such stipends for future investments or can cater for other needs.

The first reason why the NCAA should pay college athletes is the amount of money they fetch from college athletics. It will serve them ethically right if that sum of money is shared between individuals who are responsible for its generation. It is of no doubt that Americans love sports, and they would pay anything to ensure that a steady flow of people come into the field. According to the study conducted by Drexel University of sports management, the full amount of money collected by schools is able to pay the athletes and a lot left for the school and the management. In 2013, the ten institutions that collected high amount of money in school sports was approximated at $144.8 million in revenues, $132.5 million more than the normal those schools used on scholarships (McKenzie and Gordon 332). It is for this enough money that NCAA should learn to share and pay the athletes who are the champions of the game.

Secondly, some college athletes struggle to make the ends meet. Notably, the sole reason NCAA argues not to pay the students is the full scholarship they offer that covers accommodation, meal plans, and tuition (McKenzie and Gordon 330). While the above costs are covered by the scholarship, there are other expenses that are associated with being a college athlete. For example, athletes who take about 90 hours in training in some cases find when the dining facilities have been closed that compel them to use their pocket money to eat. Moreover, aspects such as buying or renting suits for compulsory banquets and fundraise are quite expensive. Lastly, there are other personal needs that the athletes intend to do which are not accommodated in the scholarship fee. Therefore, paying them will sort their financial problems.

College athletes should be paid because they do a full-time job just like any other American worker. Notably, American full-time contract stipulates that an employee should work for forty hours in a week. On the other hand, college athletes take ten hours each day when they are in class. It then means that the college athlete takes approximately 90 hours working in a week to remain in school for their scholarship (McKenzie and Gordon 335). Therefore, just like any other Americans who get paid based on the number of hours they work, athletes should also be paid since they create revenues for their organization. To worsen the situation, NCAA administrators who work for 42 hours get huge salaries while those who generate the money do not get anything.

Moreover, paying the college athletes will train them on how to manage money and learn how to save. Accordingly, money management is one of the fundamental skills that young people should learn, therefore, paying athletes even small stipends will assist them to learn to handle their money. According to Abril, whether these athletes go on to make millions of money or compelled to depart from their professional athletics, such skills are of significant importance to them (27). Therefore, if the NCAA can consider giving the college athletes certain small salary as an educational gesture, it would go a long way to promote a health management of money. Additionally, small money would teach the college athlete how to save. Particularly, saving is an amazingly significant skill that most individuals do not take part in since they lack money to make savings.

Following the discussion herein, it suffices that there are important reasons why college athletes should be paid which is very imperative to their life. First, NCAA makes a lot of money through athletics, and it is ethically important and will serve them right if they pay the athletes. Secondly, not all the athletes are rich; some struggle to make ends meet; hence, salary will be of great importance. Moreover, just like any other American citizen, college athletes work for more than 40 hours in a week and should be paid. Lastly, paying the college athlete will train the on how to save.Works Cited

McKenzie, Richard B., and Gordon Tullock. "Does the NCAA Exploit College Athletes? 1." The New World of Economics. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2012. 325-338.

Abril, Alissa. "Athlete-Students, Not Student-Athletes: Why It's Time for NCAA Athletes to Get Paid." Sports & Ent. LJ 2 (2012): 27.

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