The Meaning of July Fourth For The Negro

Published: 2018-10-31 17:55:07
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A known orator Frederick Douglass 

Frederick Douglass was a known orator whose speeches usually were published in the abolitionist newspapers. "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro," is one of his many known addresses that has since then been widely incorporated in the literature studies. During this speech, Douglass began by praising the great things that the founding fathers did for America. This was a rather positive tone to begin a captivating speech. Nonetheless, he slowly deviated from hailing the progress achieved and delved into murkier issues of slavery and the American attitude towards it. In fact, his speech progressively turned into one predominantly focused on the condemnation of American society's attitude towards slavery.

Even though Douglass was a great patriot to his country, he still had to quote some ills that existed in the nation. In the speech, he identifies himself with the slavery. Other than seeing this day as the Independence Day for America, he disputes this by alluding that it is ironical for blacks to celebrate the freedom of the white people as they continue to dwell in slavery. Frederick in his argument condemns America for failing to heed to its founding principles either before or presently. According to Douglass's speech, the current American leaders were expected to fulfill what the nation's founders advocated for back then, which is a creed for an America for all.

Douglass also condemns the churches as well as their ministers for their failure to speak against slavery. The orator claims that the silence and asserting of the current American churches regarding the existence of slavery is more sinful than the three philosophers that spoke against churches in the eighteenth century. Frederick argues that in matters of slavery, the churches are guiltier than any other party in America is. He contends that the church being an institution that has the moral authority to castigate slavery has failed to carry out its duty hence the proliferation of slavery in the US. He reminds the church of their solemn of obligation by asserting that the Church remains the last source of hope against slavery since the political leaders had failed to incorporate all that were advocated for by the freedom fighters.

sheldon

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