Symptoms of appendicitis

Published: 2019-06-13 23:15:43
554 words
2 pages
5 min to read
letter-mark
B
letter
University/College: 
Type of paper: 
This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Appendicitis is in simple terms an inflamed appendix. There are several presenting symptoms of appendicitis (Puylaert, 2012). The symptoms include pain coming from the upper abdomen. This pain is one of the first signs that someone is suffering from appendicitis. Other symptoms include lack of appetite, feelings of nausea that lead to vomiting, high fever, a swelling of the abdomen, constipation and even pain when one is urinating among several other symptoms (Puylaert, 2012).

Statistics indicates that the correct diagnosis of patients with appendicitis is at 80%. Appendicitis can be a bit difficult to diagnose because it can often look like other abdominal conditions such as ovarian cysts, rectus sheath, renal colic and PID just to mention a few (Keyzer and Gevenois, 2011). It is, therefore, important to complete physical exams, blood tests and even run imaging tests just to be sure that it is appendicitis. From past medical experiments, appendicitis has been mostly diagnosed in patients who are between the ages of 20-32. (Petroianu et al., 2004). There has not been conclusive evidence of its prevalence in a particular ethnic group or sex.

The first intervention is to prevent further complications of the appendix for e.g. rapture if it has not already happened. Additionally, it is also important to promote the comfort of the patient by reducing the pain. Lastly, I will give the patient information on the upcoming surgical procedure to remove the appendix.

In diagnosing whether a patient has appendicitis or not, I will take a history of the symptoms that a patient is experiencing. I will perform a physical exam of the abdomen by pressing on the abdomen to see whether there is an increase in pain. I will also do a lab test to establish the count of the white blood cells. An ultrasound, as well as a CT scan, will also be done to fully and accurately confirm appendicitis (Keyzer and Gevenois, 2011).

Once the tests done confirm that it is truly appendicitis, an appendectomy will be promptly scheduled and performed. If an inflamed appendix is not surgically removed, it can burst and easily become fatal. Appendectomy is believed to be the best option to cure appendicitis (Puylaert, 2012).

As mentioned above, appendectomy remains to be medically the best possible way to deal with appendicitis. Antibiotics although, can also be used to aid in the treatment of appendicitis. In specific, antibiotics such as Cefotetan and cefoxitin can be prescribed to aid in treatment (Puylaert, 2012). After the surgery, I will also prescribe pain medication for the patient to take while at home.

After an appendectomy, I will schedule a follow-up visit three weeks later to examine the incision to make sure that it is healing well. If the stitching is healing with no problem, I will also remove the stitches used during the surgery.

References

Petroianu, Andy, Oliveira-Neto, Jose Estevao de, & Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo. (2004).

Incidencia comparativa da apendicite aguda em populacao miscigenada, de

acordo com a cor da pele. Arquivos de Gastroenterologia, 41(1), 24-26. Retrieved

November 06, 2015, from

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-28032004000100005&lng=en&tlng=.

Puylaert, Julien B.C.M, P. (2012). Ultrasound of Appendicitis: And its Differential

Diagnosis. (p. 118). New York, New York: Springer Science & Business Media.

Keyzer, Caroline and Gevenois, Pierre Alain. (2011). Imaging of Acute Appendicitis in

Adults and Children. (p. 256). New York, New York: Springer Science & Business

Media.

sheldon

Request Removal

If you are the original author of this essay and no longer wish to have it published on the SpeedyPaper website, please click below to request its removal: