Personal Moral Philosophy

Published: 2017-09-16 22:13:25
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Introduction

Everyone has got their own personal moral principles, which always differ from one individual to the other. For some individuals, it is the normality of life and therefore, they always consult with their own personal philosophy before making any kind of moral decision[1]. To be precise, the personal moral philosophy can be at times unclear and undefined to many people. However, people have some form of philosophy that they follow even though they at times fail to recognize the presence of these philosophies. On this regard, the chief purpose of this paper is to uncover, evaluate, and highlight my personal moral philosophy as an organizational leader, how I apply it in my daily life, explain its strengths and weakness and later long in the paper explain how my personal morality conforms to the professional military ethic.

Personal moral philosophy

Since I was a small child, the concept of morality was something that I valued very much. To be precise, many of the decisions that I made and I considered morally correct were the values and principles that I learnt from my parents, teachers, older siblings, religious leaders, and mentors among other classes of people. Additionally, I learnt the things that I considered to be right and wrong through the process of daily socialization with my parents, where if I did something right they could congratulate and on the other hand if I did something unworthy, I was condemned there and then. Some acts such as treating the pets well, welcoming and respecting the visitors are some of the key ethical things that I have learnt with time.

Additionally, some of the key issues that I always include and value in my personal moral philosophy school of thought include; honesty, respect for everyone, understanding personal duty, courage, virtue commitment, integrity, fairness and loyalty among other key elements[2]. I believe in the values that form my underlying framework in establishing a fair view of my personal moral framework, not only for the purpose and importance of the organizational growth, but leading a fair and equal life[3]. As an organizational leader, it is important for one to promote a working environment that respects the values and beliefs of the other people, which I gain or draw from the personal moral elements and philosophies that I believe in[4]. Thus, are the values and the concepts that compose my philosophy enable me run and manage the organization with utmost skills and competency.  

According to Daniel M. Bell, Jr, people should also have appropriate moral act, which he defined as “the act that one that adheres to the moral law or principle. The right thing to do is to follow the moral law, period.”

 Describe the meaning of the “Big Three” ethical concepts (duty, outcome, virtue) and explain my reasoning for integrating each of the three within my philosophy.

In order to define these concepts, I start with Immanuel Kant (1724-18040, where he mainly emphasized on the duty of ethics (deontology). Duty of ethics in this regards is the determination or a belief that one has on doing something because it is the best or right thing to do. Simply, duty ethics mainly focused on doing[5]. To further expound the explanation, duty ethics can be further be broken down to two other explanations, which include; moral absolutes and divine command. Moral absolute means that there is ethical belief that guides or forms the absolute standards where the different moral questions can be judged on[6]. On this aspect, certain things or actions are regarded right or wrong. On the other hand, divine command is the meta-ethical theory that forms the basis of actions status, whether it is morally good and if the act is command by Supreme Being, God. Therefore, the basis of my moral philosophy is on the aspect of duty ethics and moral absolutes; since I can do something that is right because I believe it is correct to do so.

Outcome or pragmatic ethics (also referred as consequentialism) can be described as the idea or the concepts that explains the ethical validity of a position or simply an actions is based on the result of such an actions[7]. In other words, the ends justifies the means. For example, an action can only be termed as a wrong action because of the kind of the consequences that follows.

According to Daniel M. Bell, Jr, “consequentialism is also known as a teleological ethic. This is to say, it is an ethic that focuses on the end (telos), not the means. Indeed, one of the easiest ways to define a consequentialist ethic is with the phrase, “the ends justify the means.”

In addition, according to Daniel M. Bell, Jr,  the second form of consequentialism is called utilitarianism. Historically, this moral vision is associated with Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) and John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) and is summarized with the statement, “the greatest good for the greatest number.” Simply put, this moral vision holds that when you have a moral choice, you should chose the course of action that promotes the best consequences for the most people.

Virtue are kind of behaviors that have been trained and obviously results to habitual acts of any type of moral goodness. Virtue ethics mainly deals with being and not doing. In addition, virtue of philosophy mainly lays emphasize on the role of an individual’s character in relation to moral philosophy by carrying out personal duties so that proper consequences can be achieved.

Evaluate your personal philosophy by describing its strength and weakness

Critically evaluating at my personal moral philosophy, I believe it has been built as a process of learning and also through trial and error. Therefore, want to do things that are correct and also gives others an opportunity to perform what is right and good[8]. My mind, thoughts and beliefs falls in the category that beliefs people were born good; it is only the life events and experiences that change the beliefs systems and environment. I provide everyone a second chance after they fail and also grant them benefit of doubt.

Explain how your personal morality conforms to the professional military ethics

My personal philosophy conforms to the professional military ethic in the manner that I live up to the Army values in everything that I do in my life. May it be family, duty or the country, I always try as much as I can to perform everything beyond perfections and with self-dignity. I believe that living my life on such as way I can realize a positive home and be someone to be emulated upon, especially by my children. I will ensure that I leave planet earth a better place than I found, which are some of things that ethics is all about.

Conclusion

In conclusion, my personal moral philosophy is draw values from the positive doings and having lots of faith on my fellows. I also believe that the components of my philosophy incorporates the aspects of positive attitudes and hard work, which are some of the key components that Army requires all its members to uphold. They are all significant to me as an organizational leader because these values will grant me an opportunity to create good environment and proper relationship with the soldiers, may family and also the future.  Lastly, the Army leadership doctrine defines ones character the moral and ethical qualities that guides them to do what is appropriate for them to do. Character is also important component of successful leadership. The virtues that the Army values include: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity, and personal courage. 

Bibliography

Boyd, James Robert. Eclectic Moral Philosophy: Prepared for Literary Institutions and General Use. New York: Harper & brothers, 2008.

Meyers, Diana T. Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2014.

Olsthoorn, Peter. Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. SUNY Press, 2014.

[1] Meyers, Diana T. Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2014.

[2] Boyd, James Robert. Eclectic Moral Philosophy: Prepared for Literary Institutions and General Use. New York: Harper & brothers, 2008.

[3] Meyers, Diana T. Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2014.

[4] Olsthoorn, Peter. Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. SUNY Press, 2014

[5] Meyers, Diana T. Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2014.

[6] Meyers, Diana T. Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2014.

[7] Olsthoorn, Peter. Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. SUNY Press, 2014

[8] Olsthoorn, Peter. Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy. SUNY Press, 2014.

 

sheldon

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