The lessons we take from failure can be vital to later success

Published: 2019-05-29 18:06:40
572 words
2 pages
5 min to read
letter-mark
B
letter
University/College: 
Type of paper: 
This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

For twelve years, I have been much into books and due to my strong work ethics, I rarely fail in whatever I set my mind to do. From my tender age, I was labeled as academically gifted and occasionally encouraged to skip some grades. Most of the Advanced Placement (AP) classes I took in high school never really challenged me until I joined HOSA-Future Health Professionals. As an aspiring physician, my aim was to combine my love for service with my passion for healthcare. I found that balance through HOSA- an organization for students that promotes health care career opportunities and trains students to enhance the delivery of quality health care. Finally, I found a club to challenge me academically, and that suits my career interests. As anticipated, I breezed through the competitive event levels: placing first at the regional and state competitions and winning a fifth place at the national competition during my freshman year. I consistently advanced through the hierarchy of leadership positions. As a sophomore, I won the title of North Carolina HOSA State President, but that was never enough for me. My next goal was to become a National HOSA Officer. During the summer of 2015, I contested for National Office and for the first time in my educational career, I lost.

As I sat through the entire Closing Session of the 38th annual National HOSA Leadership, I was so much expecting to be among the people named on stage. When I did not hear my name called on stage, the entire world froze around me as the fact that I did not succeed. Although I was surrounded by compassionate faces and comforting hugs, the only thing I needed to do was run up to my hotel room and wallow in my loss. Pointless to say, I took this loss very negatively. My self-esteem was aggrieved and for nearly a month I slice up everything I did that could have probably caused me to lose. It was not until a good colleague gave me a pep talk that I recognized I had found the only impediment that could hinder my path to achievement: the fear of failure.

From this experience, I gathered that acceptance of failure is not intrinsic, it is learned. Due to failure, I must face the outcomes head on and learn from my fault. Nonetheless, I have already commenced to overcome this hurdle by learning from the failure of not being elected as an HOSA National Officer. Instead of regretting the loss, I took it positively as another chance to prosper. For instance, I am using the time that would have been consumed by officer duties to do further volunteer hours and work on my college applications. By changing the pattern, I am capable of looking on the constructive side of failure. In my imminent undergraduate studies, I am confident that I will come across several more failures. Though these will possibly affect me individually, they will not make me any less of a good, caring and kind hearted person.

To wrap up, Winston Churchill once said, Success is not final; failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts. Therefore, I am encouraged that my failure should act as a foundation for my future achievement. To meet with failure is not the end of the world, and I look at it as one more step on a constructive path to final success.

sheldon

Request Removal

If you are the original author of this essay and no longer wish to have it published on the SpeedyPaper website, please click below to request its removal: