The Great Gatsby

Published: 2019-09-06 14:24:14
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The 1920s was a special period, not only to the American culture but also to the entire planet earth since it marked the onset of modernism. To most Americans, it was the period that ushered in their celebrations following the devastating war. The emergence of the new technologies such as radio, print media, electricity, automobiles were the major elements that attested that modernity has set in. Scott Fitzgerald, through his novel, The Great Gatsby was able to capture the themes of modernism as well as a religion through the use of a diversified set of characters. Jay Gatsby as one of the main character in The Great Gatsby novel has been integral in the accomplishment of the myth and religion in this novel. From the novel, it can be contended that Jay Gatsby views himself as the son of God when it comes to acquisition of wealth and protection is considered.

Apparently, Gatsby hails from humble backgrounds but later on, he is portrayed to be a wealthy person who has since achieved various accomplishments in life that are associated with the wealthy high class in the American culture. His rise to the top can be linked to the teachings of Jesus Christ concerning the body of believers and how one can become the son of God. From his teachings, Jesus says that whoever believes his teachings will be called the son of God. One benefit of becoming the son of God is inheriting the Kingdom of God. From the biblical description, it can be contended that the kingdom of God is composed of huge wealth. Silver and gold, which are precious wealth components come from God, and those who are the sons of God will be given once they ask for it. By going against all odds of coming from humble backgrounds to become a wealthy person in the society, Gatsby might have utilized the teachings about being the son of God.

Jay Gatsby was born in North Dakota named James Gatz. After dropping out of school, he starts working as a fisherman in Lake Superior, fishing for salmon as well as digging for clams. In this context, fishing can be considered to be the religious imagery where the disciples of God are supposed to go and find the lost souls and bring them back to God. At some point, Jay Gatsby sees the Yacht that belongs to Dan Cody. Gatsby takes an initiative to warn them of the impending storm. This makes Cody like him, inviting him to cruise with them. Dan Cody never wanted to be identified with his parents. To him, his parents are shiftless and unsuccessful farm people. This made him decline from accepting his parents but rather to call himself a son of God. According to Cody, being the son of God meant about His Fathers Business, the service of a vast, vulgar and meretricious beauty (Fitzgerald 105). Since Jay Gatsby decides to emulate Cody, it follows that he also adopts Codys perceptions on what being the son of God means. After his death, Gatsby inherits Codys wealth as well as his legacy.

The drawing can also be used to demonstrate Gatsbys perceptions on what being the son of God entails. The drawing depicts Gatsby being watched by the doctor but at the same time, there is also another eye watching: this eye is said to belong to God. As the son of God, Gatsby expects to be watched over by God in order to overcome the storms of the world. Just like he was able to watch over the Codys yacht and warn them of the impending storm, so is the God. Such attributes of God makes Cody and later his student, Gatsby, to consider themselves to be the son of God.

Meeting with Dan Cody is the turning point of the Gatsbys life. It is through their meeting that the author of this novel is able to build the theme of myth and religion in the novel. From Gatsbys point of view, it can be contended that being the son of God means getting wealthy as well as protection against any form of worldly dangers.

References

Fitzgerald, Scott. THE GREAT GATSBY. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925. Print.

sheldon

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