Narrator research

Published: 2018-10-02 11:40:01
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The movie fight club analisys

This essay is based on the movie fight club and it focuses on the inability of the narrator to relate with his true self. As such, he has created several characters out of himself thus living multiple lives as a single person. Out of life frustrations, the narrator is angry with himself and ends up inflicting violence upon himself. This essay is therefore an analysis of the true meaning of self-inflicted violence as displayed by the narrator in Fight Club (Chuck, 49). 

The meaning of the narrator’s self-inflicted violence in fight club indicates that the narrator is struggling within himself because he is no longer comfortable with himself. As such, the narrator is trying to find himself, but he cannot have an ideal self and is, therefore, angry with himself due to his incapability. Before starting of club mayhem, the narrator is trying to define himself as a man by use of physical possessions. He buys furniture to satisfy his emptiness but does not achieve any of his intentions (Robertson, 47). As such, he further falls into aggressive confrontations with his conscience thus self-inflicted violence. Due to this anger, the narrator tries to change his lifestyle but cannot find satisfaction in anything lying awake all night thus inflicting violence on himself due to the inability to find inner peace and avoid the dependence on earthly possessions (Chuck, 49).

Self-inflicted violence

Self-inflicted violence as depicted in fight club is a way of a person hostile with his her conscience. The violence may be due to self-hate as a result of failure. When an individual especially men fail become he or she becomes miserable and thus develop hatred within their souls. As such, they develop uncontrolled feelings of anger, which may drive them to do things they never intended to (Robertson, 47). Thus, it becomes difficult to control themselves in front of others. Therefore, they do not have the ability to be themselves because of self-hatred and lack of motivation in life. The narrator in the tried to change his name so many times in every self-help group he used to attend for him to find a sense of new life. However, it has been clearly demonstrated by his conscience that even if somebody were to sleep and wake up in a different place with a different, he or she would still be the same person (Chuck, 49). 

Narrator’s self-inflicted violence is a kind of violence he is causing himself. As such, it means that the violence is resulting from inside and being expressed to the outside. The crisis of identity is a psychological problem, which comes as a result of self-denial (Robertson, 47). The conflict is further accelerated by the narrator’s way of mixing fictional life and real life. As such, he is incapable of thinking about his real self and who he really is. Due to this problem, he is unable to relate emotionally to a woman of his dreams. Thus, he feels the need to lie about his identity and ends up creating another version of himself who becomes romantically involved with the girl of his dreams (Chuck, 49). 

Sonsumerism and adoration for earthly belongings

While other men have been rendered impotent by diseases such as cancer, the narrator has rendered himself ineffective due to his consumerism and adoration for earthly belongings. As such, his friend tells him to visit other people suffering from cancer for him to experience what real pain is. His attendance at various self-help groups assists him to open up and release his anger and for once, he can find some peace within his himself (Ta, 270). This only means that the violence he is experiencing can only be alleviated by way of finding peace because it is self-inflicted. Thus, he becomes relieved by this revelation, but he still struggles to fit within the groups and therefore continues to change his name repeatedly.

The narrator’s violence starts again, when he meets a girl that he likes, but he finds hard to be himself around the woman. As such, the ferocity is accelerated by him creating another character who falls for the girl, and he cannot control the range within himself or be unable to conduct himself. This indicates that the weakness portrayed by the narrator is the major sorce of the conflict he is having with himself because he feels controlled by it. As such, lack of self-control is a serious issue for any person who cannot control his emotions because of self-anger (Ta, 270). Therefore, self-inflicted violence is caused by himself or herself. Hence, it is true to say that it all starts with how a person sees him or herself and how much value he or she attaches to himself.

In conclusion lack of self-love is a major issue, which can result in a crisis within the soul of an individual who lacks the strength to fight due to their ego and poor self-image. Poor self-image leads to lack of self-worth and hence inability to uphold value to oneself. As such, the psychological state of the individual is affected thus resulting in conscience fights that can be termed as self-inflicted. Therefore, it is important to uphold one's image to ensure that the state of mind acknowledges the reality (Ta, 270). Other individuals get into violence within themselves due to the act of trying to endure pain. Holding on pain results in emotional conflicts which lead to feelings of weakness and hence self-hate.  

 

Works Cited

Robertson, Paul. “Fight Club.” Strad 2005: 46–47. Web. https://www.unomaha.edu/jrf/vol11no2/ReedFightClub.html

Ta, Lynn M. “Hurt So Good: Fight Club, Masculine Violence, and the Crisis of Capitalism.” The Journal of American Culture 29.3 (2006): 265–277 Web

  http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst/webpages4/filmnotes/fnf04n1.html

 Chuck Palahniuk. “Fight Club” Own (2015): 49.

https://www.unomaha.edu/jrf/vol11no2/ReedFightClub.htm

    

 

sheldon

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